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Bachelor's & Master’s Portal

Research School in Stem Cell Biology

This is a tool to help students find the right project for their Bachelor’s and Master’s thesis at Lund Stem Cell Center.

How to use this portal:

Here you will find up-to-date details of BSc and MSc project titles and descriptions, supervisor contact details and links to research group webpages.

Students should register their interest in a project by contacting the respective PI and include their CV/resume.


Master’s project information:

Details of currently available MSc thesis projects can be found below.


Date of post – 25th January 2021
Project title: Identifying innate immune cell-derived contributions to salamander limb regeneration
Research group: Regenerative Immunology
Supervisor/contact: Nicholas [dot] Leigh [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Project description: Salamanders have the ability to regenerate entire limbs after amputation. This process relies on the formation of a blastema, a pool of progenitor cells that is formed in response to amputation. We know that innate immune cells are required for blastema progenitor cell formation, but are lacking an understanding of the immune cell processes and functions that are required for inducing and maintaining these progenitors cells. This project will delve into innate immune cell function, establishing in vitro and in vivo systems test innate immune cell function in regeneration. This will be coupled with next generation sequencing based approaches to understanding the consequences of perturbing immune cell function. This will lead to an understanding of how the immune systems is able to promote remarkable feats of regeneration.


Date of post – 25th January 2021
Project title: Engineering of human bone and bone marrow organoids
Research group: Cell, Tissue & Organ Engineering
Supervisor/contact: Paul [dot] Bourgine [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Project description: Our lab has developed advanced bioengineering techniques offering the generation of human organoids. Inspired from developmental processes, human mesenchymal cell lines can be programmed to form cartilage, bone and bone marrow tissues in vitro and in vivo. Our objective is to identify the cells and factors that are essential in the engineering process. This can be achieved by gain/loss of functions study and the analysis of possible functional impacts on generated organoids. Multiples techniques are being used (flow cytometry, microscopy, gene editing, animal models, 3D culture systems, cell culture, spatial-omics) to compile human-specific information. We are looking for enthusiastic candidates with an healthy ambition to discover. Candidates with bioinformatic skills are also encouraged to apply, for transcriptomic analysiy of human dataset.


Date of post – 27h January 2021
Project title: Harnessing cell reprogramming for cancer immunotherapy
Research group: Cell Reprogramming and Immunity
Supervisor/contact: Filipe [dot] Pereira [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Project description: An important hallmark of cancer is the ability to evade the immune system. Genetic mutations in tumor cells result in the accumulation of tumor antigens, however, increased cell heterogeneity, downregulation of antigen presentation or inhibition of immune cell infiltration allows immune surveillance evasion. For the first time, direct cell reprogramming offers exciting opportunities to overcome these challenges. We recently identified a combination of transcription factors sufficient to reprogram mouse fibroblasts into antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), providing a new strategy to set in motion antigen-specific immune responses. We now hypothesize that a similar combination reprograms tumor cells into antigen presenting cells. The current project aims to develop a Trojan horse therapy (TrojanDC) by reprogramming cancer cells to become traitors to their kind. The goal is to prove that intra-tumoural injection of the reprogramming factors as a gene therapy makes cancer cells become antigen-presenting dendritic cells, bypassing cancer evasion mechanisms in an off-the-shelf, completely personalised therapy system. Key experimental approaches will include molecular cloning, flow cytometry, high-content automated image acquisition and analysis, gene expression profiling, cellular transplantation and Crispr/Cas9 gene editing.

Reference: Rosa & Pires et al. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into antigen-presenting dendritic cells. Science Immunology, featured in the cover of December issue 2018.


Date of post – 27h January 2021
Project title: Single cell analysis to elucidate efficient immune cell reprogramming
Research group: Cell Reprogramming and Immunity
Supervisor/contact: Ilia [dot] kurochkin [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Project description: Cellular reprogramming can be achieved experimentally in different ways, including nuclear transfer, cell fusion or expression of transcription factors that have been mainly explored in regenerative medicine. We have recently pioneered cell fate reprogramming approaches in immunology with induced dendritic cells (Rosa et al, Science Immunology 2018). This conceptual shift opens exciting opportunities to merge cellular reprogramming and cancer immunotherapy, leading to the generation of patient-specific immune cells for immunotherapy.

We are currently generating large amounts of population and single cell transcriptomics data along with chromatin accessibility and transcription factor occupancy in both mice and humans for characterization and better understanding of reprogramming process. We are looking for a candidate with a background in bioinformatics, who will work on development and deployment of novel computational tools, aimed for comparative analysis of extensive single-cell and population dataset collections. On top of that, those integrated collections should be analysed in the context of regulatory signatures obtained by ATAC-seq and ChIP-seq experiments. These signatures will allow to decipher underlying molecular and epigenetic mechanisms that can be modulated to optimize the reprogramming process.

Candidate profile:

  • Familiarity with at least one of the following programming languages: R, Python , as well as general proficiency with UNIX operating systems.
  • Familiarity with next generation sequencing data analysis pipelines.
  • Strong interest in learning and developing computational skills.


Bachelor’s project information:

Details of currently available BSc thesis projects can be found below.


Date of post – 25th January 2021
Project title: Engineering of human bone and bone marrow organoids
Research group: Cell, Tissue & Organ Engineering
Supervisor/contact: Paul [dot] Bourgine [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

Project description: Our lab has developed advanced bioengineering techniques offering the generation of human organoids. Inspired from developmental processes, human mesenchymal cell lines can be programmed to form cartilage, bone and bone marrow tissues in vitro and in vivo. Our objective is to identify the cells and factors that are essential in the engineering process. This can be achieved by gain/loss of functions study and the analysis of possible functional impacts on generated organoids. Multiples techniques are being used (flow cytometry, microscopy, gene editing, animal models, 3D culture systems, cell culture, spatial-omics) to compile human-specific information. We are looking for enthusiastic candidates with an healthy ambition to discover. Candidates with bioinformatic skills are also encouraged to apply, for transcriptomic analysiy of human dataset.

 

Available positions at Lund Stem Cell Center

 

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