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Steering group members

Research School in Stem Cell Biology

Christine KarlssonChristine Karlsson

Executive Director
Christine [dot] Karlsson [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

 

My role within the Research School

I am the Executive Director of the Research School in Stem Cell Biology at the Stem Cell Center at Lund University, and responsible for the overall operation and development of the Research School. Together with the Steering group and the Board, I develop and implement educational and strategic plans for the Research School whose mission is to train the next generation of stem cell scientists. I manage the day-to-day operation of the School, mentor and motivate our members, and am also responsible for the external and internal communication of the Research School.

My research background

My broad research interests involve stem cell biology and regenerative medicine, and I am particularly interested in hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells. I received my PhD in Molecular Medicine from Lund University in 2013 after a one-year research visit at the UCL Cancer Institute in London, UK, during 2012 - 2013. I then trained as a postdoctoral fellow at Lund University between 2013 - 2014 before I joined the Research School in 2014. Show LinkedIn profile

My vision for the Research School

My vision for the Research School is to strengthen the education and training of the next generation of stem cell scientists. I believe that establishing and maintaining positive working relationships built on mutual trust and responsibility, clear communication, and the power of respect, kindness and self-awareness are key to academic and professional success. 


David Bryder

David Bryder

Scientific Director
David [dot] Bryder [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se 

 

My role within the Research School

I am the Scientific Director of the Research School (appointed Summer 2016). A main task of this role is to oversee the range of activities that associate with the Research School and to continuously work on their development, in order to meet the continuously evolving demands of modern research in stem cell biology.

My research background

I conducted my PhD studies at the Stem Cell Centre at Lund University (graduated 2003), working mainly to characterize extrinsic regulators of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Between 2003-2005, I conducted postdoctoral studies at Stanford University, where I developed a research interest on the consequences of age on hematopoietic stem cells. In 2006, I returned to Lund University to establish my own research group at the Section for Immunology and in 2015, my group joined the then newly established Division of Molecular Hematology. The research interests of my group include how hematopoiesis is regulated both normally as well as in disease (leukemia), which also includes a long-standing interest in how aging contributes to dysregulated hematopoiesis and if such features can be reversed. Show LinkedIn profile

My vision for the Research School

My vision for the Research School is that it should act to promote high-level scientific development within the field of stem cell biology at all academic career stages (undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral and group leader levels).


Jenny Hansson

Jenny Hansson

Educational Program
jenny [dot] hansson [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

 

My role within the Research School

I have had the pleasure to be the Course Leader of the Preparatory Program in Stem Cell Biology 2014-2017 and will from mid 2017 take on responsibilities in our novel Educational Program for already enrolled PhD students. We will there focus on scientific communication and scientific writing. The part that I enjoy the most is to follow the students’ progress and to give tailored guidance to our students. In addition, together with the others in the Steering group, I help shaping and developing the future of the Research School.

My research background

I conducted my PhD studies at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, working on the molecular effect of gut microbiota on immune system development. I then trained as a postdoctoral fellow in quantitative proteomics at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL Heidelberg, Germany) between 2011 and 2014, focusing on proteomic changes during cellular development. It was there that my great interest for hematopoiesis arose. I then came to Lund and started my research group in 2016. The broad interest of our group lies in understanding the proteomic differences between fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Show LinkedIn profile

My vision for the Research School

By fostering both scientific and professional development, the Research School will train the stem cell research leaders of tomorrow.


Henrik Ahlenius

Henrik Ahlenius

Educational Program
Henrik [dot] Ahlenius [at] med [dot] lu [dot] se

 

My role within the Research School

I am responsible for the Educational Program comprising of the “Meet the Experts” and the “Educational Seminar Series”. In addition, I am part of the Steering group, the executive organ, involved in decision making, forming and developing the Research School. I take great pride in being part of training the next generation of stem cell scientists.

My research background

I started my scientific career when moving to Lund for my master thesis, working on hematopoiesis. I then switched to neuroscience for my PhD studies, which focused on the effect of stroke, inflammation and aging on neural stem cells and neurogenesis. I went on to do a post-doc at Stanford University where I studied direct cellular reprograming, aging and disease modeling. I returned to Lund and started my own group in 2014. In my group we are using stem cell-, reprogramming- and genome-engineering technologies to understand how the brain, neural stem and neural cells are affected by aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Show LinkedIn profile

My vision for the Research School

Having myself attended a Research School I have first hand knowledge of the benefits this type of education can have. My time in the Biomedical Research School really helped my career. Therefore, my aim is that the Research School should give students and postdocs the best possible education and preparations for their future careers as independent scientists. This should encompass both development of scientific qualifications as well as career planning, social aspects and enculturation.

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